Climate change to make UK summers more than 5C hotter by 2070, Met Office warns

Climate change to make UK summers more than 5C hotter by 2070, Met Office warns

Climate change: UK summers could be over 5C warmer by 2070

A decade ago, the UK took a bold step adopting the Climate Change Act, pledging to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

It has been a contributing factor to extremes this year like Spring's Beast from the East and a two-month summer heatwave.

UK weather warning: British summer temperatures to SKYROCKET as climate change HITS

The Climate Change Act committed the UK government by law to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80% of 1990 levels by 2050.

Certainly not to the ashes of Paradise, California, a grim preview of a new reality that could slash up to a tenth off US GDP by the end of the century. And certainly not to the Arctic circle, where the indigenous Sami people are demanding state aid to help prevent their reindeer herds from starving to death as a result of unprecedented drought and wildfires.

This includes reducing emissions from the devolved administrations (Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland), which currently account for about 20% of the UKs emissions.

Climate change: UK summers to be 5.4C hotter and sea levels to rise 1.15m by 2100

Much of this progress has come from new ways to generate electricity. Coal-fired power plants are being closed as more electricity is produced without burning fossil fuels.

There are plenty of reasons to feel pessimistic about humanitys future. Presented with our greatest ever challenge, scientists and technologists are showing the way forward

Most detailed picture yet of changing climate launched

Last year, for the first time, the majority of the UKs electricity came from renewable or low-carbon sources.

No action on climate change could mean even more extreme weather for the UK

And over the last decade, the UKs economy has continued to grow proving that a move to renewable sources would not harm economic growth.

The Met Office issued a stark warning on Monday that summer temperatures could soar to 5.4C higher than current levels by 2070, while winters could be up to 4.2C warmer if fossil fuel pollution continues.

Rainfall could fall by almost half (47%) in summer by 2070, while rain could be up by more than a third (35%) in winter.

Sea levels affecting London, where the Thames Barrier is expected to be in use to protect the city until 2070, could rise by up to 1.15 metres by 2100 if climate-warming emissions continue to climb.

Climate change and other interrelated environmental impacts are exacerbating poverty and erasing, or increasing the fragility of, development gains, and the crisis facing our natural world is growing, he said. Protecting and restoring nature is essential for securing genuinely sustainable development. That is why we need to ensure that our funding for international development supports work to deal with climate change and biodiversity loss.

Cardiff is expected to have similar sea level rises as London, while in Edinburgh seas could rise by as much 49cm with low emissions and up to 90cm with high emissions.

In Belfast, seas could be as much as 52cm higher with low emissions and up to 94cm by the end of the century with high levels of climate pollution.

Defra will develop a new resources and waste strategy, setting out measures to improve the use of resources, increasing re-use and recycling, minimising waste and creating a more circular economy. Food waste will be a priority, with more councils encouraged to collect food waste separately and send it to anaerobic digestion plants to create biogas for domestic heating. A new £15 fund will redistribute surplus food to charities.

Climate change has also been a contributing factor to losing, on average, 60% of wildlife populations since 1970.

Farmers will be central to many parts of the climate strategy, with Gove promising reforms around how fertilisers are used and a new emissions reduction plan for agriculture, at the same time as encouraging farmers to grow more food. Farmers would be supported by the government in reducing the emissions from their land and activities, Gove said, but he did not specify what form this support would take.

Drier summers and wetter winters could be coming to the UK

The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) believes if we carry on as we are now, then one in six species is at risk of extinction around the world as a result of climate change.

The agriculture bill currently before parliament will reward farmers who reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help to adapt their land to a changing climate. Next year, Defra will start developing a new emissions reduction plan for agriculture, including ways to reform fertiliser use, which produces greenhouse gas emissions and ammonia, a key contributor to air pollution.

The Committee on Climate Change, a body set up as part of the Act, has said emissions from the UKs transport system, buildings and industry are not falling fast enough.

In addition, emissions from the waste we produce need to be limited and action taken on protecting homes from extreme heat and flooding.

New water supply infrastructure will also be needed, and Gove raised the possibility of new reservoirs, which could prove controversial in some areas. This week, the government will lay before parliament a new draft national policy statement that will set out measures to make it easier for water companies to build reservoirs and water transfer infrastructure.

New data gives the most detailed picture yet of temperature, rainfall and sea level rise over next century

• Sea level rise is likely to be greater in the south than the north, with London expected to be in the range of 0.29-0.7m by the end of the century if greenhouse gas emissions are kept low, but 0.53-1.15m if emissions are high. Edinburgh is likely to experience a rise of only 0.08-0.49m in a low-emissions scenario, and 0.3-0.9m if emissions are high

The UKs most comprehensive picture yet of how the climate could change over the next century has been launched today by Environment Secretary Michael Gove.

“Residents of York are all too familiar with the impact of climate chaos,” said a spokesman. “The extreme rainfall brought about by Storm Eva led to the rivers Foss and Ouse bursting their banks. This left huge sections of the city underwater.

Most detailed picture yet of UKs future climate

Using the latest science from the Met Office and around the world, the UK Climate Projections 2018 illustrate a range of future climate scenarios until 2100 – showing increasing summer temperatures, more extreme weather and rising sea levels are all on the horizon and urgent international action is needed.

It said York had been included in its national list of frontlines due to the impact of extreme rainfall and flooding, which risked “getting ever more brutal” due to government failure to take necessary action.

To help homes and businesses plan for the future, the results set out a range of possible outcomes over the next century based on different rates of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The high emission scenario shows:

Sea levels are projected to rise over the 21st century and beyond under all emission scenarios – meaning we can expect to see an increase in both the frequency and magnitude of extreme water levels around the UK coastline.

FLOOD-HIT communities in York are in the “frontline of climate chaos”, Friends of the Earth claimed today.

Rising sea levels and higher temperatures threaten UK, experts warn

The UK already leads the world in tackling climate change – with emissions reduced by more than 40 per cent since 1990. However these projections show a future we could face without further action.

UKCP18 can now be used as a tool to guide decision-making and boost resilience – whether thats through increasing flood defences, designing new infrastructure or adjusting ways of farming for drier summers.

British summers could be 9°F hotter by 2070 sparking more wildfires and water shortages

This cutting-edge science opens our eyes to the extent of the challenge we face, and shows us a future we want to avoid.

The UK is already a global leader in tackling climate change, cutting emissions by more than 40 per cent since 1990 – but we must go further.

By having this detailed picture of our changing climate, we can ensure we have the right infrastructure to cope with weather extremes, homes and businesses can adapt, and we can make decisions for the future accordingly.

Todays projections are the first major update of climate projections in nearly 10 years, building on the success of UKCP09 and ensuring the most up-to-date scientific evidence informs decision-making.

With climate change a global challenge, for the first time, UKCP presents international projections, allowing other nations to use this data to gauge future risks for food supply chains, or check rainfall projections for the likelihood of localised flooding.

Climate change will affect everybody. UKCP18 is designed to help everybody make better decisions, from those buying a house to people making large investments in infrastructure. It has been produced using state-of-the-art methods.

The new science in UKCP18 enables us to move from looking at the trends associated with climate change, to describing how seasonal weather patterns will change. For example, heatwaves like the one we experienced in the summer of 2018 could be normal for the UK by mid-century.

While the UK continues to play a leading role in limiting the causes of global warming and halting temperature rises, some changes to the climate are inevitable. Building on the UK governments long-term plan for adapting to a changing climate, these projections will help businesses, investors, local authorities, industry and individuals plan for a wide range of possible future changes – alongside taking action to reduce the likelihood of the worst-case scenario becoming reality.

Todays announcement also comes as the UK marks the 10th anniversary of its Climate Change Act – the worlds first legally binding legislation to tackle climate change. Just last month the government hosted Green GB Week – a week of action highlighting the economic opportunities from tackling climate change, encouraging communities and businesses to do more.

While these projections highlight the need for further urgent action, since 1990 the UK has cut emissions by more than 40 per cent while growing the economy by more than two thirds, the best performance on a per person basis than any other G7 nation.

These projections from leading UK scientists build on last months report from climate experts, highlighting the stark reality that we must do more to tackle climate change in order to avoid devastating impacts on our health and prosperity.

We are already leading the world in the fight against climate change but we cannot be complacent. As we look towards crucial global climate talks in Poland next week, it is clear that now, more than ever, is the time for collective and ambitious action to tackle this urgent challenge.

While it is not possible to give a precise prediction of how weather and climate will change years into the future, UKCP18 provides a range of outcomes that capture the spread of possible future climates, so we can develop and test robust plans.

The projections will be factored into the UKs flood adaptation planning and the Environment Agencys advice to flood and coastal erosion risk management authorities.

Since 2010 government has invested a record £2.6 billion in flood defences, and we are on track to protect 300,000 more homes from flooding by 2021.

The UK18 projections are further evidence that we will see more extreme weather in the future – we need to prepare and adapt now, climate change impacts are already being felt with the record books being re-written.

It is not too late to act. Working together – governments, business, and communities – we can mitigate the impacts of climate change and adapt to a different future.

The Environment Agency cannot wall up the country, but will be at the forefront – protecting communities, building resilience, and responding to incidents.

UKCP18 has been developed by the Met Office Hadley Centre, in partnership with Defra, BEIS, the Devolved Administrations and the Environment Agency, and has been extensively peer reviewed by an independent science panel.

People and businesses will be able to use UKCP18 to explore the types and magnitude of climate change projected for the future, while government will use the projections to inform its adaptation and mitigation planning and decision-making.

Dont include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.

To help us improve GOV.UK, wed like to know more about your visit today. Well send you a link to a feedback form. It will take only 2 minutes to fill in. Dont worry we wont send you spam or share your email address with anyone.

More news:

Police forced to watch dad, 39, drown after inspector ordered officers not to rescue him from river
Police forced to watch dad, 39, drown after inspector ordered officers not to rescue him from river
Gangland feud led to double murder of underworld Mr Big Paul Massey and mob fixer John Kinsella
Gangland feud led to double murder of underworld Mr Big Paul Massey and mob fixer John Kinsella
Met Office issues DANGER TO LIFE weather warning ahead of Storm Diana hitting UK tomorrow
Met Office issues DANGER TO LIFE weather warning ahead of Storm Diana hitting UK tomorrow
Chelsea news: Maurizio Sarri is WRONG to do that – big change SLAMMED on live TV
Chelsea news: Maurizio Sarri is WRONG to do that – big change SLAMMED on live TV
Special constable and his Hungarian wife flew woman into the UK to work as prostitutes
Special constable and his Hungarian wife flew woman into the UK to work as prostitutes
Turn around, go back home: Trump defends use of teargas on migrants
Turn around, go back home: Trump defends use of teargas on migrants
How a photographer captured the image of a migrant mother and her children fleeing tear gas
How a photographer captured the image of a migrant mother and her children fleeing tear gas
Donald Trump: Theresa Mays Brexit deal could harm UK trade with US
Donald Trump: Theresa Mays Brexit deal could harm UK trade with US
Police told not to enter river to rescue drowning man because they werent trained, inquest hears
Police told not to enter river to rescue drowning man because they werent trained, inquest hears
Trump-Xi G-20 meeting offers best chance in months to defuse US-China trade fight
Trump-Xi G-20 meeting offers best chance in months to defuse US-China trade fight
Prostitutes flown in by special constable and wife for sex work at upmarket London flats, court told
Prostitutes flown in by special constable and wife for sex work at upmarket London flats, court told
What can snowbirds expect from Winter 2019?
What can snowbirds expect from Winter 2019?